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Jobs

Starting with RoadRunner >= 2.4, a queuing system (aka "jobs") is available. This plugin allows you to move arbitrary "heavy" code into separate tasks to execute them asynchronously in an external worker, which will be referred to as "consumer" in this documentation.

The RoadRunner PHP library provides both API implementations: The client one, which allows you to dispatch tasks, and the server one, which provides the consumer who processes the tasks.

queue

Installation

Requirements

  • PHP >= 7.4
  • RoadRunner >= 2.4
  • ext-protobuf (optional)

To get access from the PHP code, you should put the corresponding dependency using the Composer.

$ composer require spiral/roadrunner-jobs

Configuration

After installing all the required dependencies, you need to configure this plugin. To enable it add jobs section to your configuration.

For example, in this way, you can configure both the client and server parts to work with RabbitMQ.

version: "2.7"
#
# RPC is required for tasks dispatching (client)
#
rpc:
  listen: tcp://127.0.0.1:6001

#
# This section configures the task consumer (server)
#
server:
  command: php consumer.php
  relay: pipes

#
# In this section, the jobs themselves are configured
#
jobs:
  consume: [ "test" ]   # List of RoadRunner queues that can be processed by 
                        # the consumer specified in the "server" section.
  pipelines:
    test:               # RoadRunner queue identifier
      driver: memory    # - Queue driver name
      config:
        priority: 10
        prefetch: 10
  • The rpc section is responsible for client settings. It is at this address that we will connect, dispatching tasks to the queue.

  • The server section is responsible for configuring the server. Previously, we have already met with its description when setting up the PHP Worker.

  • And finally, the jobs section is responsible for the work of the queues themselves. It contains information on how the RoadRunner should work with connections to drivers, what can be handled by the consumer, and other queue-specific settings.

Common Configuration

Let's now focus on the common settings of the queue server. In full, it may look like this:

version: "2.7"

jobs:
  num_pollers: 64
  timeout: 60
  pipeline_size: 100000
  pool:
    num_workers: 10
    allocate_timeout: 60s
    destroy_timeout: 60s
  consume: [ "queue-name" ]
  pipelines:
    queue-name:
      driver: # "[DRIVER_NAME]"
      config: # NEW in 2.7
        # And driver-specific configuration below...

Above is a complete list of all possible common Jobs settings. Let's now figure out what they are responsible for.

  • num_pollers - The number of threads that concurrently read from the priority queue and send payloads to the workers. There is no optimal number, it's heavily dependent on the PHP worker's performance. For example, "echo workers" may process over 300k jobs per second within 64 pollers (on 32 core CPU).

  • timeout - The internal timeouts via golang context (in seconds). For example, if the connection was interrupted or your push in the middle of the redial state with 10 minutes timeout (but our timeout is 1 min for example), or queue is full. If the timeout exceeds, your call will be rejected with an error. Default: 60 (seconds).

  • pipeline_size - The "binary heaps" priority queue (PQ) settings. Priority queue stores jobs inside according to its' priorities. Priority might be set for the job or inherited by the pipeline. If worker performance is poor, PQ will accumulate jobs until pipeline_size will be reached. After that, PQ will be blocked until workers process all the jobs inside.

    Blocked PQ means, that you can push the job into the driver, but RoadRunner will not read that job until PQ will be empty. If RoadRunner will be killed with jobs inside the PQ, they won't be lost, because jobs are deleted from the drivers' queue only after Ack.

  • pool - All settings in this section are similar to the worker pool settings described on the configuration page.

  • consume - Contains an array of the names of all queues specified in the "pipelines" section, which should be processed by the concierge specified in the global "server" section (see the PHP worker's settings).

  • pipelines - This section contains a list of all queues declared in the RoadRunner. The key is a unique queue identifier, and the value is an object from the settings specific to each driver (we will talk about it later).

Memory Driver

This type of driver is already supported by the RoadRunner and does not require any additional installations.

Note that using this type of queue driver, all data is in memory and will be destroyed when the RoadRunner Server is restarted. If you need persistent queue, then it is recommended to use alternative drivers: amqp, beanstalk or sqs.

The complete memory driver configuration looks like this:

version: "2.7"

jobs:
  pipelines:
    # User defined name of the queue.
    example:
      # Required section.
      # Should be "memory" for the in-memory driver.
      driver: memory

      config: # NEW in 2.7
        # Optional section.
        # Default: 10
        priority: 10

        # Optional section.
        # Default: 10
        prefetch: 10

Below is a more detailed description of each of the in-memory-specific options:

  • priority - Queue default priority for each task pushed into this queue if the priority value for these tasks was not explicitly set.

  • prefetch - A local buffer between the PQ (priority queue) and driver. If the PQ size is set to 100 and prefetch to 100000, you'll be able to push up to prefetch number of jobs even if PQ is full.

Please note that this driver cannot hold more than 1000 tasks with delay at the same time (RR limitation)

Local (based on the boltdb) Driver

This type of driver is already supported by the RoadRunner and does not require any additional installations. It uses boltdb as its main storage for the jobs. This driver should be used locally, for testing or developing purposes. It can be used in the production, but this type of driver can't handle huge load. Maximum RPS it can have no more than 30-50.

Data in this driver persists in the boltdb database file. You can't open same file simultaneously for the 2 pipelines or for the KV plugin and Jobs plugin. This is boltdb limitation on concurrent access from the 2 processes to the same file.

The complete boltdb driver configuration looks like this:

version: "2.7"

boltdb:
  permissions: 0777

jobs:
  pipelines:
    # User defined name of the queue.
    example:
      # Required section.
      # Should be "boltdb" for the local driver.
      driver: boltdb

      config: # NEW in 2.7
        # BoldDB file to create or DB to use
        # Default: "rr.db"
        file: "path/to/rr.db"

        # Optional section.
        # Default: 10
        priority: 10

        # Optional section.
        # Default: 1000
        prefetch: 1000

Below is a more detailed description of each of the in-memory-specific options:

  • priority - Queue default priority for each task pushed into this queue if the priority value for these tasks was not explicitly set.

  • prefetch - A local buffer between the PQ (priority queue) and driver. If the PQ size is set to 100 and prefetch to 100000, you'll be able to push up to prefetch number of jobs even if PQ is full.

  • file - boltdb database file to use. Might be a full path with file: /foo/bar/rr1.db. Default: rr.db.

NATS Driver

NATS driver supported in the RR starting from the v2.5.0 and includes only NATS JetStream support. The complete NATS driver configuration looks like this:

version: "2.7"

nats:
  addr: "demo.nats.io"

jobs:
  num_pollers: 10
  pipeline_size: 100000
  pool:
    num_workers: 10
    max_jobs: 0
    allocate_timeout: 60s
    destroy_timeout: 60s

  pipelines:
    test-1:
      driver: nats
      config: # NEW in 2.7
        prefetch: 100
        subject: default
        stream: foo
        deliver_new: true
        rate_limit: 100
        delete_stream_on_stop: false
        delete_after_ack: false
        priority: 2

Below is a more detailed description of each of the in-memory-specific options:

  • subject - nats subject.
  • stream - stream name.
  • deliver_new - the consumer will only start receiving messages that were created after the consumer was created.
  • rate_limit - NATS rate limiter.
  • delete_stream_on_stop - delete the whole stream when pipeline stopped.
  • delete_after_ack - delete message after it successfully acknowledged.

AMQP Driver

Strictly speaking, AMQP (and 0.9.1 version used) is a protocol, not a full-fledged driver, so you can use any servers that support this protocol (on your own, only rabbitmq was tested) , such as: RabbitMQ, Apache Qpid or Apache ActiveMQ. However, it is recommended to use RabbitMQ as the main implementation, and reliable performance with other implementations is not guaranteed.

To install and configure the RabbitMQ, use the corresponding documentation page. After that, you should configure the connection to the server in the "amqp" section. This configuration section contains exactly one addr key with a connection DSN.

amqp:
  addr: amqp://guest:guest@localhost:5672

After creating a connection to the server, you can create a new queue that will use this connection and which will contain the queue settings (including amqp-specific):

version: "2.7"

amqp:
  addr: amqp://guest:guest@localhost:5672

jobs:
  pipelines:
    # User defined name of the queue.
    example:
      # Required section.
      # Should be "amqp" for the AMQP driver.
      driver: amqp

      config: # NEW in 2.7

        # Optional section.
        # Default: 10
        priority: 10

        # Optional section.
        # Default: 100
        prefetch: 100

        # Optional section.
        # Default: "default"
        queue: "default"

        # Optional section.
        # Default: "amqp.default"
        exchange: "amqp.default"

        # Durable queue
        #
        # Default: false
        durable: false

        # Delete queue when stopping the pipeline
        #
        # Default: false
        delete_queue_on_stop: false

        # Optional section.
        # Default: "direct"
        exchange_type: "direct"

       # Optional section.
        # Default: "" (empty)
        routing_key: ""

        # Optional section.
        # Default: false
        exclusive: false

        # Optional section.
        # Default: false
        multiple_ack: false

        # Optional section.
        # Default: false
        requeue_on_fail: false

Below is a more detailed description of each of the amqp-specific options:

  • priority - Queue default priority for for each task pushed into this queue if the priority value for these tasks was not explicitly set.

  • prefetch - The client can request that messages be sent in advance so that when the client finishes processing a message, the following message is already held locally, rather than needing to be sent down the channel. Prefetching gives a performance improvement. This field specifies the prefetch window size in octets. See also "prefetch-size" in AMQP QoS documentation reference.

  • queue - AMQP internal (inside the driver) queue name.

  • exchange - The name of AMQP exchange to which tasks are sent. Exchange distributes the tasks to one or more queues. It routes tasks to the queue based on the created bindings between it and the queue. See also "AMQP model" documentation section.

  • exchange_type - The type of task delivery. May be one of direct, topics, headers or fanout.

    • direct - Used when a task needs to be delivered to specific queues. The task is published to an exchanger with a specific routing key and goes to all queues that are associated with this exchanger with a similar routing key.

    • topics - Similarly, direct exchange enables selective routing by comparing the routing key. But, in this case, the key is set using a template, like: user.*.messages.

    • fanout - All tasks are delivered to all queues even if a routing key is specified in the task.

    • headers - Routes tasks to related queues based on a comparison of the (key, value) pairs of the headers property of the binding and the similar property of the message.

    • routing_key - Queue's routing key.

    • exclusive - Exclusive queues can't be redeclared. If set to true and you'll try to declare the same pipeline twice, that will lead to an error.

    • multiple_ack - This delivery and all prior unacknowledged deliveries on the same channel will be acknowledged. This is useful for batch processing of deliveries. Applicable only for the Ack, not for the Nack.

    • requeue_on_fail - Requeue on Nack.

NEW in 2.7:

  • durable: create a durable queue. Default: false
  • delete_queue_on_stop: delete the queue when the pipeline is stopped. Default: false

Beanstalk Driver

Beanstalk is a simple and fast general purpose work queue. To install Beanstalk, you can use the local queue server or run the server inside AWS Elastic. You can choose any option that is convenient for you.

Setting up the server is similar to setting up AMQP and requires specifying the connection in the "beanstalk" section of your RoadRunner configuration file.

beanstalk:
  addr: tcp://127.0.0.1:11300

After setting up the connection, you can start using it. Let's take a look at the complete config with all the options for this driver:

version: "2.7"

beanstalk:
  # Optional section.
  # Default: tcp://127.0.0.1:11300
  addr: tcp://127.0.0.1:11300

  # Optional section.
  # Default: 30s
  timeout: 10s

jobs:
  pipelines:
    # User defined name of the queue.
    example:
      # Required section.
      # Should be "beanstalk" for the Beanstalk driver.
      driver: beanstalk

      config: # NEW in 2.7

        # Optional section.
        # Default: 10
        priority: 10

        # Optional section.
        # Default: 1
        tube_priority: 1

        # Optional section.
        # Default: default
        tube: default

        # Optional section.
        # Default: 5s
        reserve_timeout: 5s

These are all settings that are available to you for configuring this type of driver. Let's take a look at what they are responsible for:

  • priority - Similar to the same option in other drivers. This is queue default priority for for each task pushed into this queue if the priority value for these tasks was not explicitly set.

  • tube_priority - The value for specifying the priority within Beanstalk is the internal priority of the server. The value should not exceed int32 size.

  • tube - The name of the inner "tube" specific to the Beanstalk driver.

SQS Driver

Amazon SQS (Simple Queue Service) is an alternative queue server also developed by Amazon and is also part of the AWS service infrastructure. If you prefer to use the "cloud" option, then you can use the ready-made documentation for its installation.

In addition to the possibility of using this queue server within the AWS, you can also use the local installation of this system on your own servers. If you prefer this option, then you can use softwaremill's implementation of the Amazon SQS server.

After you have created the SQS server, you need to specify the following connection settings in sqs configuration settings. Unlike AMQP and Beanstalk, SQS requires more values to set up a connection and will be different from what we're used to:

sqs:
  # Required AccessKey ID.
  # Default: empty
  key: access-key

  # Required secret access key.
  # Default: empty
  secret: api-secret

  # Required AWS region.
  # Default: empty
  region: us-west-1

  # Required AWS session token.
  # Default: empty
  session_token: test

  # Required AWS SQS endpoint to connect.
  # Default: http://127.0.0.1:9324
  endpoint: http://127.0.0.1:9324

Please note that although each of the sections contains default values, it is marked as "required". This means that in almost all cases they are required to be specified in order to correctly configure the driver.

After you have configured the connection - you should configure the queue that will use this connection:

NOTE:
You may also skip the whole sqs configuration section (global, not the pipeline) to use the AWS IAM credentials if the RR is inside the EC2 machine. RR will try to detect env automatically by making an http request to the http://169.254.169.254/latest/dynamic/instance-identity/ as pointer here: link

version: "2.7"

sqs:
  # SQS connection configuration...

jobs:
  pipelines:
    # Required section.
    # Should be "sqs" for the Amazon SQS driver.
    driver: sqs

    config:

      # Optional section.
      # Default: 10
      prefetch: 10

      # Optional section.
      # Default: 0
      visibility_timeout: 0

      # Optional section.
      # Default: 0
      wait_time_seconds: 0

      # Optional section.
      # Default: default
      queue: default

      # Optional section.
      # Default: empty
      attributes:
        DelaySeconds: 42
        # etc... see https://docs.aws.amazon.com/AWSSimpleQueueService/latest/APIReference/API_SetQueueAttributes.html

      # Optional section.
      # Default: empty
      tags:
        test: "tag"

Below is a more detailed description of each of the SQS-specific options:

  • prefetch - Number of jobs to prefetch from the SQS. Amazon SQS never returns more messages than this value (however, fewer messages might be returned). Valid values: 1 to 10. Any number bigger than 10 will be rounded to 10. Default: 10.

  • visibility_timeout - The duration (in seconds) that the received messages are hidden from subsequent retrieve requests after being retrieved by a ReceiveMessage request. Max value is 43200 seconds (12 hours). Default: 0.

  • wait_time_seconds - The duration (in seconds) for which the call waits for a message to arrive in the queue before returning. If a message is available, the call returns sooner than WaitTimeSeconds. If no messages are available and the wait time expires, the call returns successfully with an empty list of messages. Default: 5.

  • queue - SQS internal queue name. Can contain alphanumeric characters, hyphens (-), and underscores (_). Default value is "default" string.

  • attributes - List of the AWS SQS attributes.

    For example

    attributes:
      DelaySeconds: 0
      MaximumMessageSize: 262144
      MessageRetentionPeriod: 345600
      ReceiveMessageWaitTimeSeconds: 0
      VisibilityTimeout: 30
  • tags - Tags don't have any semantic meaning. Amazon SQS interprets tags as character.

    Please note that this functionality is rarely used and slows down the work of queues: https://docs.aws.amazon.com/AWSSimpleQueueService/latest/SQSDeveloperGuide/sqs-queue-tags.html

Client (Producer)

Now that we have configured the server, we can start writing our first code for sending the task to the queue. But before doing this, we need to connect to our server. And to do this, it is enough to create a Jobs instance.

// Server Connection
$jobs = new Spiral\RoadRunner\Jobs\Jobs();

Please note that in this case we have not specified any connection settings. And this is really not required if this code is executed in a RoadRunner environment. However, in the case that a connection is required to be established from a third-party application (for example, a CLI command), then the settings must be specified explicitly.

$jobs = new Spiral\RoadRunner\Jobs\Jobs(
    // Expects RPC connection
    Spiral\Goridge\RPC\RPC::create('tcp://127.0.0.1:6001')
);

After we have established the connection, we should check the server availability and in this case the API availability for the jobs. This can be done using the appropriate isAvailable() method. When the connection is created, and the availability of the functionality is checked, we can connect to the queue we need using connect() method.

$jobs = new Spiral\RoadRunner\Jobs\Jobs();

if (!$jobs->isAvailable()) {
    throw new LogicException('The server does not support "jobs" functionality =(');
}

$queue = $jobs->connect('queue-name');

Task Creation

Before submitting a task to the queue, you should create this task. To create a task, it is enough to call the corresponding create() method.

$task = $queue->create(SendEmailTask::class);
// Expected:
// object(Spiral\RoadRunner\Jobs\Task\PreparedTaskInterface)

Note that the name of the task does not have to be a class. Here we are using SendEmailTask just for convenience.

Also, this method takes an additional second argument with additional data to complete this task.

$task = $queue->create(SendEmailTask::class, ['email' => 'dev@null.pipe']);

You can also use this task as a basis for creating several others.

$task = $queue->create(SendEmailTask::class);

$first = $task->withValue('john.doe@example.com');
$second = $task->withValue('john.snow@the-wall.north');

Task Dispatching

And to send tasks to the queue, we can use different methods: dispatch() and dispatchMany(). The difference between these two implementations is that the first one sends a task to the queue, returning a dispatched task object, while the second one dispatches multiple tasks, returning an array. Moreover, the second method provides one-time delivery of all tasks in the array, as opposed to sending each task separately.

$a = $queue->create(SendEmailTask::class, ['email' => 'john.doe@example.com']);
$b = $queue->create(SendEmailTask::class, ['email' => 'john.snow@the-wall.north']);

foreach ([$a, $b] as $task) {
    $result = $queue->dispatch($task);
    // Expected:
    // object(Spiral\RoadRunner\Jobs\Task\QueuedTaskInterface)
}

// Using a batching send
$result = $queue->dispatchMany($a, $b);
// Expected:
// array(2) {
//    object(Spiral\RoadRunner\Jobs\Task\QueuedTaskInterface),
//    object(Spiral\RoadRunner\Jobs\Task\QueuedTaskInterface)
// }

Task Immediately Dispatching

In the case that you do not want to create a new task and then immediately dispatch it, you can simplify the work by using the push method. However, this functionality has a number of limitations. In case of creating a new task:

  • You can flexibly configure additional task capabilities using a convenient fluent interface.
  • You can prepare a common task for several others and use it as a basis to create several alternative tasks.
  • You can create several different tasks and collect them into one collection and send them to the queue at once (using the so-called batching).

In the case of immediate dispatch, you will have access to only the basic features: The push() method accepts one required argument with the name of the task and two optional arguments containing additional data for the task being performed and additional sending options (for example, a delay). Moreover, this method is designed to send only one task.

use Spiral\RoadRunner\Jobs\Options;

$payload = ['email' => $email, 'message' => $message];

$task = $queue->push(SendEmailTask::class, $payload, new Options(
    delay: 60 // in seconds
));

Task Payload

As you can see, each task, in addition to the name, can contain additional data (payload) specific to a certain type of task. You yourself can determine what data should be transferred to the task and no special requirements are imposed on them, except for the main ones: Since this task is then sent to the queue, they must be serializable.

The default serializer used in jobs allows you to pass anonymous functions as well.

In case to add additional data, you can use the optional second argument provided by the create() and push() methods, or you can use the fluent interface to supplement or modify the task data. Everything is quite simple here; you can add data using the withValue() method, or delete them using the withoutValue() method.

The first argument of the withValue() method passes a payload value as the required first argument. If you also need to specify a key for it, just pass it as an optional second argument.

$task = $queue->create(CreateBackup::class)
    ->withValue('/var/www')
    ->withValue(42, 'answer')
    ->withValue('/dev/null', 'output');

// An example like this will be completely equivalent to if we passed
// all this data at one time
$task = $queue->create(CreateBackup::class, [
    '/var/www',
    'answer' => 42,
    'output' => '/dev/null'
]);

// On the other hand, we don't need an "answer"...
$task = $task->withoutValue('answer');

Task Headers

In addition to the data itself, we can send additional metadata that is not related to the payload of the task, that is, headers. In them, we can pass any additional information, for example: Encoding of messages, their format, the server's IP address, the user's token or session id, etc.

Headers can only contain string values and are not serialized in any way during transmission, so be careful when specifying them.

In the case to add a new header to the task, you can use methods similar to PSR-7. That is:

  • withHeader(string, iterable<string>|string): self - Return an instance with the provided value replacing the specified header.
  • withAddedHeader(string, iterable<string>|string): self - Return an instance with the specified header appended with the given value.
  • withoutHeader(string): self - Return an instance without the specified header.
$task = $queue->create(RestartServer::class)
    ->withValue('addr', '127.0.0.1')
    ->withAddedHeader('access-token', 'IDDQD');

$queue->dispatch($task);

Task Delayed Dispatching

If you want to specify that a job should not be immediately available for processing by a jobs worker, you can use the delayed job option. For example, let's specify that a job shouldn't be available for processing until 42 minutes after it has been dispatched:

$task = $queue->create(SendEmailTask::class)
    ->withDelay(42 * 60); // 42 min * 60 sec

Consumer Usage

You probably already noticed that when setting up a jobs consumer, the "server" configuration section is used in which a PHP file-handler is defined. Exactly the same one we used earlier to write a HTTP Worker. Does this mean that if we want to use the Jobs Worker, then we can no longer use the HTTP Worker? No it is not!

During the launch of the RoadRunner, it spawns several workers defined in the "server" config section (by default, the number of workers is equal to the number of CPU cores). At the same time, during the spawn of the workers, it transmits in advance to each of them information about the mode in which this worker will be used. The information about the mode itself is contained in the environment variable RR_ENV and for the HTTP worker the value will correspond to the "http", and for the Jobs worker the value of "jobs" will be stored there.

queue-mode

There are several ways to check the operating mode from the code:

  • By getting the value of the env variable.
  • Or using the appropriate API method (from the spiral/roadrunner-worker package).

The second choice may be more preferable in cases where you need to change the RoadRunner's mode, for example, in tests.

use Spiral\RoadRunner\Environment;
use Spiral\RoadRunner\Environment\Mode;

// 1. Using global env variable
$isJobsMode = $_SERVER['RR_MODE'] === 'jobs';

// 2. Using RoadRunner's API
$env = Environment::fromGlobals();

$isJobsMode = $env->getMode() === Mode::MODE_JOBS;

After we are convinced of the specialization of the worker, we can write the corresponding code for processing tasks. To get information about the available task in the worker, use the $consumer->waitTask(): ReceivedTaskInterface method.

use Spiral\RoadRunner\Jobs\Consumer;
use Spiral\RoadRunner\Jobs\Task\ReceivedTaskInterface;

$consumer = new Consumer();

/** @var Spiral\RoadRunner\Jobs\Task\ReceivedTaskInterface $task */
while ($task = $consumer->waitTask()) {
    var_dump($task);
}

After you receive the task from the queue, you can start processing it in accordance with the requirements. Don't worry about how much memory or time this execution takes - the RoadRunner takes over the tasks of managing and distributing tasks among the workers.

After you have processed the incoming task, you can execute the complete(): void method. After that, you tell the RoadRunner that you are ready to handle the next task.

$consumer = new Spiral\RoadRunner\Jobs\Consumer();

while ($task = $consumer->waitTask()) {

    //
    // Task handler code
    //

    $task->complete();
}

We got acquainted with the possibilities of receiving and processing tasks, but we do not yet know what the received task is. Let's see what data it contains.

Task Failing

In some cases, an error may occur during task processing. In this case, you should use the fail() method, informing the RoadRunner about it. The method takes two arguments. The first argument is required and expects any string or string-like (instance of Stringable, for example any exception) value with an error message. The second is optional and tells the server to restart this task.

$consumer = new Spiral\RoadRunner\Jobs\Consumer();
$shouldBeRestarted = false;

while ($task = $consumer->waitTask()) {
    try {
        //
        // Do something...
        //
        $task->complete();
    } catch (\Throwable $e) {
        $task->fail($e, $shouldBeRestarted);
    }
}

In the case that the next time you restart the task, you should update the headers, you can use the appropriate method by adding or changing the headers of the received task.

$task
    ->withHeader('attempts', (int)$task->getHeaderLine('attempts') - 1)
    ->withHeader('retry-delay', (int)$task->getHeaderLine('retry-delay') * 2)
    ->fail('Something went wrong', requeue: true)
;

In addition, you can re-specify the task execution delay. For example, in the code above, you may have noticed the use of a custom header "retry-delay", the value of which doubled after each restart, so this value can be used to specify the delay in the next task execution.

$task
    ->withDelay((int)$task->getHeaderLine('retry-delay'))
    ->fail('Something went wrong', true)
;

Received Task ID

Each task in the queue has a unique identifier. This allows you to unambiguously identify the task among all existing tasks in all queues, no matter what name it was received from.

In addition, it is worth paying attention to the fact that the identifier is not a sequential number that increases indefinitely. It means that there is still a chance of an identifier collision, but it is about 1/2.71 quintillion. Even if you send 1 billion tasks per second, it will take you about 85 years for an ID collision to occur.

echo $task->getId(); 
// Expected Result
// string(36) "88ca6810-eab9-473d-a8fd-4b4ae457b7dc"

In the case that you want to store this identifier in the database, it is recommended to use a binary representation (16 bytes long if your DB requires blob sizes).

$binary = hex2bin(str_replace('-', '', $task->getId()));
// Expected Result
// string(16) b"ˆÊh\x10ê¹G=¨ýKJäW·Ü"

Received Task Queue

Since a worker can process several different queues at once, you may need to somehow determine from which queue the task came. To get the name of the queue, use the getQueue(): string method.

echo $task->getQueue();
// Expected
// string(13) "example-queue"

For example, you can select different task handlers based on different types of queues.

// This is just an example of a handler
$handler = $container->get(match($task->getQueue()) {
    'emails'  => 'email-handler',
    'billing' => 'billing-handler',
    default   => throw new InvalidArgumentException('Unprocessable queue [' . $task->getQueue() . ']')
});

$handler->process($task);

Received Task Name

The task name is some identifier associated with a specific type of task. For example, it may contain the name of the task class so that in the future we can create an object of this task by passing the required data there. To get the name of the task, use the getName(): string method.

echo $task->getName();
// Expected
// string(21) "App\\Queue\\Task\\EmailTask"

Thus, we can implement the creation of a specific task with certain data for this task.

$class = $task->getName();

if (!class_exists($class)) {
    throw new InvalidArgumentException("Unprocessable task [$class]");
}

$handler->process($class::fromTask($task));

Received Task Payload

Each task contains a set of arbitrary user data to be processed within the task. To obtain this data, you can use one of the available methods:

getValue

Method getValue() returns a specific payload value by key or null if no value was passed. If you want to specify any other default value (for those cases when the payload with the identifier was not passed), then use the second argument, passing your own default value there.

if ($task->getName() !== SendEmailTask::class) {
    throw new InvalidArgumentException('Does not look like a mail task');
}

echo $task->getValue('email');              // "john.doe@example.com"
echo $task->getValue('username', 'Guest');  // "John"

hasValue

To check the existence of any value in the payload, use the hasValue() method. This method will return true if the value for the payload was passed and false otherwise.

if (!$task->hasValue('email')) {
    throw new InvalidArgumentException('The "email" value is required for this task');
}

$email->sendTo($task->getValue('email'));

getPayload

Also you can get all data at once in array(string|int $key => mixed $value) format using the getPayload method. This method may be useful to you in cases of transferring all data to the DTO.

$class = $task->getName();
$arguments = $task->getPayload();

$dto = new $class(...$arguments);

You should pay attention that an array can contain both int and string keys, so you should take care of their correct pass to the constructor yourself. For example, the code above will work completely correctly only in the case of PHP >= 8.1. And in the case of earlier versions of the language, you should use the reflection functionality, or pass the payload in some other way.

Since the handler process is not the one that put this task in the queue, then if you send any object to the queue, it will be serialized and then automatically unpacked in the handler. The default serializer suitable for most cases, so you can even pass Closure instances. However, in the case of any specific data types, you should manage their packing and unpacking yourself, either by replacing the serializer completely, or for a separate value. In this case, do not forget to specify this both on the client and consumer side.

Received Task Headers

In the case that you need to get any additional information that is not related to the task, then for this you should use the functionality of headers.

For example, headers can convey information about the serializer, encoding, or other metadata.

$message = $task->getValue('message');
$encoding = $task->getHeaderLine('encoding');

if (strtolower($encoding) !== 'utf-8') {
    $message = iconv($encoding, 'utf-8', $message);
}

The interface for receiving headers is completely similar to PSR-7, so methods are available to you:

  • getHeaders(): array<string, array<string, string>> - Retrieves all task header values.
  • hasHeader(string): bool - Checks if a header exists by the given name.
  • getHeader(string): array<string, string> - Retrieves a message header value by the given name.
  • getHeaderLine(string): string - Retrieves a comma-separated string of the values for a single header by the given name.

We got acquainted with the data and capabilities that we have in the consumer. Let's now get down to the basics - sending these messages.

Advanced Functionality

In addition to the main functionality of queues for sending and processing in API has additional functionality that is not directly related to these tasks. After we have examined the main functionality, it's time to disassemble the advanced features.

Creating A New Queue

In the very first chapter, we got acquainted with the queue settings and drivers for them. In approximately the same way, we can do almost the same thing with the help of the PHP code using create() method through Jobs instance.

To create a new queue, the following types of DTO are available to you:

  • Spiral\RoadRunner\Jobs\Queue\AMQPCreateInfo for AMQP queues.
  • Spiral\RoadRunner\Jobs\Queue\BeanstalkCreateInfo for Beanstalk queues.
  • Spiral\RoadRunner\Jobs\Queue\MemoryCreateInfo for in-memory queues.
  • Spiral\RoadRunner\Jobs\Queue\SQSCreateInfo for SQS queues.

Such a DTO with the appropriate settings should be passed to the create() method to create the corresponding queue:

use Spiral\RoadRunner\Jobs\Jobs;
use Spiral\RoadRunner\Jobs\Queue\MemoryCreateInfo;

$jobs = new Jobs();

//
// Create a new "example" in-memory queue
//
$queue = $jobs->create(new MemoryCreateInfo(
    name: 'example',
    priority: 42,
    prefetch: 10,
));

Getting A List Of Queues

In that case, to get a list of all available queues, you just need to use the standard functionality of the foreach operator. Each element of this collection will correspond to a specific queue registered in the RoadRunner. And to simply get the number of all available queues, you can pass a Job object to the count() function.

$jobs = new Spiral\RoadRunner\Jobs\Jobs();

foreach ($jobs as $queue) {
    var_dump($queue->getName()); 
    // Expects name of the queue
}

$count = count($jobs);
// Expects the number of a queues

Pausing A Queue

In addition to the ability to create new queues, there may be times when a queue needs to be suspended for processing. Such cases can arise, for example, in the case of deploying a new application, when the processing of tasks should be suspended during the deployment of new application code.

In this case, the code will be pretty simple. It is enough to call the pause() method, passing the names of the queues there. In order to start the work of queues further (unpause), you need to call a similar resume() method.

$jobs = new Spiral\RoadRunner\Jobs\Jobs();

// Pause "emails", "billing" and "backups" queues.
$jobs->pause('emails', 'billing', 'backups');

// Resuming only "emails" and "billing".
$jobs->resume('emails', 'billing');

RPC Interface

All communication between PHP and GO made by the RPC calls with protobuf payloads. You can find versioned proto-payloads here: Proto.

  • Push(in *jobsv1beta.PushRequest, out *jobsv1beta.Empty) error - The arguments: the first argument is a PushRequest, which contains one field of the Job being sent to the queue; the second argument is Empty, which means that the function does not return a result (returns nothing). The error returned if the request fails.

  • PushBatch(in *jobsv1beta.PushBatchRequest, out *jobsv1beta.Empty) error - The arguments: the first argument is a PushBatchRequest, which contains one repeated (list) field of the Job being sent to the queue; the second argument is Empty, which means that the function does not return a result. The error returned if the request fails.

  • Pause(in *jobsv1beta.Pipelines, out *jobsv1beta.Empty) error - The arguments: the first argument is a Pipelines, which contains one repeated (list) field with the string names of the queues to be paused; the second argument is Empty, which means that the function does not return a result. The error returned if the request fails.

  • Resume(in *jobsv1beta.Pipelines, out *jobsv1beta.Empty) error - The arguments: the first argument is a Pipelines, which contains one repeated (list) field with the string names of the queues to be resumed; the second argument is Empty, which means that the function does not return a result. The error returned if the request fails.

  • List(in *jobsv1beta.Empty, out *jobsv1beta.Pipelines) error - The arguments: the first argument is an Empty, meaning that the function does not accept anything (from the point of view of the PHP API, an empty string should be passed); the second argument is Pipelines, which contains one repeated (list) field with the string names of the all available queues. The error returned if the request fails.

  • Declare(in *jobsv1beta.DeclareRequest, out *jobsv1beta.Empty) error - The arguments: the first argument is an DeclareRequest, which contains one map<string, string> pipeline field of queue configuration; the second argument is Empty, which means that the function does not return a result. The error returned if the request fails.

  • Stat(in *jobsv1beta.Empty, out *jobsv1beta.Stats) error - The arguments: the first argument is an Empty, meaning that the function does not accept anything (from the point of view of the PHP API, an empty string should be passed); the second argument is Stats, which contains one repeated (list) field named Stats of type Stat. The error returned if the request fails.

From the PHP point of view, such requests (List for example) are as follows:

use Spiral\Goridge\RPC\RPC;
use Spiral\Goridge\RPC\Codec\ProtobufCodec;
use Spiral\RoadRunner\Jobs\DTO\V1\Maintenance;

$response = RPC::create('tcp://127.0.0.1:6001')
    ->withServicePrefix('jobs')
    ->withCodec(new ProtobufCodec())
    ->call('List', '', Maintenance::class);